Tips on Creating a Cool Game Room For Your Family

 A game room in a house can be a room where the whole family can hang out and have fun. Creating your own game room at home would be a great award system for your kids who work so hard at school. You and your partner might even sign up for the fun too.

There are a lot of things that you can put in your game room. Here are a few suggestions to get you inspired.

Your game room is going to need lots of colors. Gaming is fun so inject color in your room in a tasteful way. Opt to choose bright and vibrant colors to give the room an exciting and energetic feel. Paint your wall apple green, yellow or light orange to give the wall a lively sun kissed theme. This room has to pop. Your wall color has to coincide with the fun that will go on into this room.

Choose furniture that are colorful too. A big sofa and several individual sitting options are a must. Remember, your family will be spending a lot of time here so get seating in. Your kids might also decide to bring their friends over so it helps if you have many of seating options. You can use big curved couches for a more intimate and cozy feel. Bean bags are a great option for individual seating. They are funky and comfortable additions to your game room.

Put in a high definition tv in your game room. The tv will be useful for the kids to play games on. By bringing one to this space, it also doubles as a movie room. You can plug in your favorite flicks and watch it with your family. Attach a reliable dvd player and good speakers to match.

Be sure to have sturdy shelves to put in your tv and other gadgets like a cd player, computer or a radio.

A game room wouldn’t be one without the games. Here are some games for you to choose from.

1. Billiard (Pool Table)
2. Miniature Golf Course/Track
3. Pinball Machine
4. Basketball Machine
5. Bowling Machine
6. Console Games: Xbox provided (such as Tennis, Dance Central, Drum Revolution, Guitar Mania, Car Racing and etc.)
7. Chess
8. Mini Games (like snakes and ladders, scrabble and etc.)

Choose a game that best fits your family. You can also take it to the next level and add a karaoke machine, popcorn machine, an ice cream maker, a refrigerator and lots more.

Personalize your game room and make it your family’s fun wonderland. Give your family a treat by making this room as creative looking as possible. It should have fun! fun! fun! written all over it. Indulge once in awhile in a game or two. Show your kids that they don’t have to go out to have a good time. You and your family are guaranteed to spend hours and hours playing games and spending precious time with one another in this fun wonderland.

Super Mario For Brown People

As a brown kid, it was tough to find media where I felt like I could relate. As I grow older, it’s become slightly easier to come to terms with this; but it’s very much a continuing struggle.

In video games, this has always been a bit difficult. One of the games that captured my imagination (as it did most people) was Super Mario 3 for the NES. I remember that the game excited me but also kinda scared me (Why was the sun so angry at me?). Its style made sense to my infant mind, but more importantly did not exclude me as an Asian kid. I believe this is because of two things. Firstly, the limited graphics of pixels meant that it was difficult to capture skin colours so most characters were generically white. While this has some obvious implications (Eurocentric), it actually meant that skin colour was reduced to a few pixels. Mario was white and European, did it matter? No. Was he really Italian? I guess he was. But the point is this wasn’t really a representation of the struggles of an Italian plumber. This was fun. There was a target to get to, and you just had to do it to the back drop of some fantastical graphics. Mario and Luigi were such bloated stereotypes it was difficult to take them seriously. When I played as Mario, I was Mario.

Secondly, as a Japanese game (which I didn’t really think of at the time) all the referents where alien in the west. It wasn’t quite a “white” world because culturally speaking all the referents were not there in the West. Tanooki suits? Goombas? It meant nothing to us, it just looked great and meant as a brown kid I didn’t feel excluded. In fact, I felt very much part of this fantasy world, and was glad to spend hours scouring it for secrets (and still do!).

It’s actually the final irony of video games that as graphics in games are now more “realistic” they end up reproducing real world discriminations. I am way more likely to come across stereotypes of brown people in video games in full HD, than I ever was as a child (not to say there were none in the pixel period). This is a real shame, and I feel that as games attempt to capture the “Hollywood” movie feel (for bigger returns) it will simply duplicate the same problematic issues that the cinema has been criticised for.